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Last Updated: 07/31/2008 05:00PM • Subscribe via RSSATOM

Napa Valley

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

With airline tickets and foreign exchange rates working against the common traveler, it’s no wonder so many of us have thrown in the towel on planning a summer vacation. But don’t give up yet; with fresh hotels and eateries popping up, and the fabulous new Oxbow Public Market open for business, Napa is looking better than ever. And if you’re thinking wine country is only for the winos...think again. Gourmet ShoppingThe brainchild of Steve Carlin, the grocery purveyor who helped launch San Francisco’s Ferry Building Marketplace, Oxbow Public Market is a gourmand’s paradise for a mere 11 bucks. The Oxbow building, which houses 10-plus “farmstands” daily, is next door to COPIA (The American Center for Wine, Food and the Arts), and across the street from the terminal for the Napa Valley Wine Train. Back inside Oxbow, shop after family-owned shop of organic meats and locally grown seasonal produce are complimented with gusto by artisan bread, a charcuterie, fish market, handcrafted cheeses and florists. On the banks of the Napa River, the market’s offerings also include wine merchants, live music, home goods vendors and a family-friendly riverfront location...<hr>For more about Napa Valley, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Alaska

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

So you’re dreading another repressive Sacramento summer, and you’re thinking that this time around an escape from the heat might be in order. Or maybe you’re looking to shake things up a little and try something completely unconventional to avoid the monotony of yet another trip to…Fresno. You begin to salivate at the thought of exciting international destinations, but the falling value of the dollar makes Europe and many other points beyond, increasingly prohibitive. Not to worry, it’s still possible to think exotic without even leaving the country. Here’s an idea that’ll make you feel like you’ve left the continent without the hassle of international travel. How about…Alaska?If your impression of Alaska is of igloos and polar bears, then you’re definitely due for an update. Instead, think of ice masses the size of Delaware, the largest mountain range this side of the Himalayas, unimaginable wildlife viewing, and the mystical beauty of the Northern Lights, along with the opportunity to hike on a glacier, get a sunburn at midnight, or be the first to step on land that no human has ever touched before. Sorry, no penguins here, though. You’ll need to head to the other end of the planet for that. And whether you’re traveling with your family, are the honeymooning type, are with the retired set, or just flying solo, Alaska has something for everyone.With apologies to Captain Kirk and Star Trek fans, it’s Alaska where the locals consider the Final Frontier. And the stats would back them up. Alaska is largely wilderness, with more than 65 percent of the land owned by the government in the form of national forests, national parks, or national wildlife refuges. Barely boasting one resident per square mile, outside of the state’s major cities of Anchorage, Juneau and Fairbanks, the remaining population would seem to match the number of patrons at the Roseville Galleria on a busy weekend.Although Alaska might be the best-kept travel secret in the country, it might not be for much longer. The state is beginning to experience a strong surge of tourism, which for travelers, has been left to relative obscurity since it became an American territory after being purchased from the Russians in 1867. Since then, the 49th state has had its moment in the spotlight about once every half-decade. Its economy is known for two “rushes,” including the discovery of gold in the 1890s in the Yukon Territory and the 1968 discovery of oil in Prudhoe Bay, the latter now responsible for 80 percent of the state’s current revenue. But the word is getting out. A new economic boom may be looming on the horizon. With cruise revenues taking off, and with more miles of coast than all of the other US states combined, there’s a seemingly infinite amount of opportunity to take in the picturesque scenery. The vast majority of nautical activity takes place around the islands of Southeast Alaska, otherwise known as the Inside Passage. A steady parade of these large ships turn their ports of call, such as Sitka, into instant farmers markets, with the locals offering everything from homemade trinkets to fresh fish, sometimes temporarily doubling or tripling the size of these towns. Although cruise ships offer the best opportunity to see a wide variety of maritime activities in a short period of time, for the traveler who runs in the opposite direction of pre-packaged vacations, there are millions of acres of vast wilderness and uncharted frontier just begging to be explored. Although Alaska’s largest cities and coastal lands generate their fair amount of tourists, it’s the breathtaking scenic wilderness that sets Alaska aside from anything else in the world. Camping, fishing, hiking, kayaking, mountain climbing, wildlife viewing, and yes, gold panning are favorite activities for tourists looking to get off the beaten path. But you haven’t experienced Alaska at its most extreme until you’ve ventured north of the Arctic Circle to the coastal town of Barrow, the northernmost establishment on the continent. If you didn’t know any better, you’d think you were on the moon – no vegetation to speak of, just sand and rocks, and for two months in winter, no sun. With no mountains or other land barriers nearby, there’s nothing to stop the frigid Arctic wind on its way down from the North Pole, creating a never-ending blizzard of dust and ice. But don’t think about driving – flying is the only way in or out, as there are no roads that lead to Barrow, just miles of permafrost as far as the eye can see. And for the ultimate travel buzz, take the tour out of town to Point Barrow, the northern tip of North America, which, on most days, is the coldest spot in the country. Open up that box of Popsicles you bought back in Barrow while sticking your feet into the Arctic, and you’ll have an instant cocktail party conversation starter. So if you’re in search of a destination to spice up your summer that won’t break the bank, a trip to Alaska is just what the doctor ordered. Not only is it easier (and cheaper) than a trip to even New York City or much of the east coast, but it will also open your eyes to surreal landscape you never dreamed existed – right here in your very own country.

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Eco-Friendly Territory

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

No one gets a pass for eco-irresponsibility these days, but there are mends to be made, locally. With this in mind, Style has hopped on board the latest eco-conscious initiative sponsored by the City of Roseville, which is offering kids from South Placer County a chance to “Ride Green All Summer” with a Summer Youth Bus Pass. This invaluable ticket to ride – available to elementary and high school aged youngsters – costs a scant $10 (or, the unfortunate equivalent of roughly five seconds at the pump). With it, kids receive the keys to accessibility and can visit a number of coveted destinations throughout town through August 31 via Auburn, Lincoln, Placer County and Roseville Transits. But more than getting a great cost-savings that will no doubt help local parents save on their skyrocketing gas bills while also taming their safety concerns, kids will learn a priceless environmental lesson by becoming contributors and keepers of the community and the planet, both of which they will eventually inherit and pass on to their children. And that’s to say absolutely nothing of helping them land a topic for their “What I Did On My Summer Vacation” essays. Plus, they can put all the extra money they pocket towards a purchase at such youth-friendly stores as Dimple Records, Rocklin Bowl, Ground Zero Clothing & Board Shop, Cold Stone Creamery and other retailers offering special discounts to participating bus riders. So help your kids take the route less traveled this summer by purchasing a Summer Youth Bus Pass at one of three locations in Roseville: the Alternative Transportation office (401 Vernon Street, or over the phone via credit card; 916-774-5293), the Maidu Community Center (1550 Maidu Drive) or the Roseville Sports Center (1545 Pleasant Grove Boulevard). For routes, schedules and instructions on how to travel outside the previously listed areas, or from region to region, visit the City of Roseville online at roseville.ca.us.For more Green Tips, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville, Granite Bay, Rocklin edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Style: Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin
Local Area Tidbits

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

We hope our annual pet issue will inspire you to take a moment or two for the animals, whether it’s your own pet or local wildlife! One way to get involved is to attend Placer SPCA’s volunteer orientation on August 2, beginning at 10 a.m. A $25 individual fee includes a t-shirt, nametag and training materials. Call 916-782-7722 for more information…It’s August, and that means the countdown to summer’s end has begun...time to make the most of those long summer days and nights! Kids can save a dollar and the environment as they get out and about before hitting the books – students in elementary, junior, and high school can do their part to “spare the air” by purchasing a $10 bus pass that allows unlimited rides through the end of the month on Roseville Transit, Auburn Transit, Lincoln Transit and Placer County Transit. Check out the GreenScene on page 41 for details...It looks like there will be some new faces in the classroom this school year – the Rocklin Chamber of Commerce will welcome more than 75 new teachers to the district with a special luncheon on August 11…Antelope High School will hold Summer Splash, a three-day high school prep camp, from August 11-13. Topics ranging from math and English remediation to social skills and test-taking help will be covered in sessions that run from 8 a.m. to noon. Call 916-726-1400 for more information…Congratulations are in order for Sierra College; The California Community College Commission on Athletics and National Alliance of Two-Year College Athletic Administrators ranked Sierra third in the nation for overall athletic excellence…Now’s a great time to cool off at Fountains! Surely you’ve been to Roseville’s newest shopping center by now, but it’s time to make another trip! Check out the new stores opening this month: boutique/salon/spa Article, maternity and baby outfitter Belly Bou, innovative burger bar The Counter Burger, relaxation haven InSpa, activewear shop Lucy, sweet treat Mirabello Gelato, athletic retailer New Balance, and Sacramento’s popular bit-of-everything boutique Serendipity…Eppie’s Great Race, the long-running (this year’s race marks the 35th anniversary!) fundraiser organized by regional restaurateur Eppie Johnson, raised more than $48,000 to benefit programs for the Sacramento County Therapeutic Recreation services, which supports people with mental and physical disabilities. This was no ordinary donation, however – The Sacramento County Board of Supervisors received the cash in a Deal or No Deal-inspired presentation, complete with a Howie Mandel costume and briefcase models from sponsor California Family Fitness…Restaurateur Bruce Johnson formed a partnership with his uncle Eppie to re-open the new Horseshoe Bar Grill of Loomis, a well-loved local restaurant. From the renovation and redecorating of the 92-year-old building to the reinterpretation of the American menu, every aspect of the restaurant is experiencing new life…The popular Gourd and Garden Show, now in it’s third year, will be exhibited at Lincoln Arts through August 15, call 916-645-9713 for more information…Congratulations to former FoothillStyle contributor Corky Oakes, who has just published her second book, Señor Fideles: Adventurer of Sierra Nevada and Beyond. This environmentally-themed novel tells the parable of a bird who struggles to adapt to his changing environment, based on Donner Lake. Check in next month for news and notes from our annual art and wine issue!

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Muang Thai

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

Coconut milk, yellow curry, garlic, peanut sauce, ginger, pineapple, cashew nuts and mangos are just a few of the fresh ingredients Yuwadee Latti utilizes in her incredible Thai cuisine. Her husband, Anan, explains that they use only the freshest and highest quality vegetables, meat and seafood, along with premium-grade jasmine rice.Anan and Yuwadee worked at a Thai restaurant in San Jose for six years before moving here to open their own restaurant. Recipes passed down from their mothers have formed the nucleus of the menu at Muang Thai, but Yuwadee has developed her own style of cooking adapting authentic Thai dishes to please the American palate. One of Yuwadee’s goals is to create a Thai-style dish using the sushi technique. She also plans to develop a hamburger using the ingredients in the Eggplant Kee Mao dish, which is a customer favorite at Muang Thai. Muang Thai is a family-run business that brings most of its customers in by word-of-mouth. They also offer catering and parties, and even offer kuntok-style seating (guests sit on the floor at a low table), which is great for special occasions and dining with good friends for the full Thai experience.For your own Thai experience at home, try this popular dish...For Chef Latti's Thai recipe for Prik King Goong, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville, Granite Bay, Rocklin edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Separation Anxiety

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

Just three months ago, your child was still a child – just finishing high school and relying upon you for their basic needs.But now, August is upon us, and it’s time to see your high school graduate off to start the great journey they call “college.” You may be anxious, and, despite their excitement, your teen may experience some unsettling feelings as well. Leaving for college is a time of transition and often, a time of great anxiety: separation anxiety. Though separation anxiety first occurs in babies and toddlers, it can reoccur during major separation in adult life, such as leaving for college. “For college freshmen, separation anxiety is a very real concern,” says Karen Adrian, LMFT of El Dorado Hills. She also notes that although some students may acclimate quickly to their surroundings, others may experience intense anxiety that is difficult to manage.Our experts say that feelings of separation anxiety are completely normal, and according to Tisa Starr, LMFT with offices in Auburn and Roseville, your teen may feel a mix of emotions. “The biggest time of individuation from parents is when a child leaves for college, and they realize ‘I am fully responsible for me now.’ That can be very frightening,” says Starr. Although students may grow excited as they prepare to leave, they may also feel a sense of loss. They realize, “My time of being a kid is over.” “When you’re having that conversation of ‘goodbye,’ remind your child that this is an exciting time, but that it’s normal to feel a sense of loss when making a change. Try to normalize any feelings of separation anxiety but leave the door open so that if it gets excessive, the child knows to talk to you or seek help,” advises Andrea Orr, LMFT with a private practice in Roseville. “Open and honest discussion is important,” adds Adrian. In the event that your teen experiences excessive anxiety, he or she may be experiencing separation anxiety disorder. In this case, students may need professional help, and they can make an appointment at their school counseling center for additional support.Ultimately, the best way to deal with separation anxiety is to talk about it, Star advises the teens whom she works with. “Remember that everyone is probably feeling the same thing, so find someone to start a dialogue with so that you won’t feel so alone,” she says.Experts suggest that parents do some of the following to help teens deal with normal levels of separation anxiety:

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Separation Anxiety

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

Just three months ago, your child was still a child – just finishing high school and relying upon you for their basic needs. But now, August is upon us, and it’s time to see your high school graduate off to start the great journey they call “college.” You may be anxious, and, despite their excitement, your teen may experience some unsettling feelings as well. Leaving for college is a time of transition and often, a time of great anxiety: separation anxiety. Though separation anxiety first occurs in babies and toddlers, it can reoccur during major separation in adult life, such as leaving for college. “For college freshmen, separation anxiety is a very real concern,” says Karen Adrian, LMFT of El Dorado Hills. She also notes that although some students may acclimate quickly to their surroundings, others may experience intense anxiety that is difficult to manage. Our experts say that feelings of separation anxiety are completely normal, and according to Tisa Starr, LMFT with offices in Auburn and Roseville, your teen may feel a mix of emotions. “The biggest time of individuation from parents is when a child leaves for college, and they realize ‘I am fully responsible for me now.’ That can be very frightening,” says Starr. Although students may grow excited as they prepare to leave, they may also feel a sense of loss. They realize, “My time of being a kid is over.” “When you’re having that conversation of ‘goodbye,’ remind your child that this is an exciting time, but that it’s normal to feel a sense of loss when making a change. Try to normalize any feelings of separation anxiety but leave the door open so that if it gets excessive, the child knows to talk to you or seek help,” advises Andrea Orr, LMFT with a private practice in Roseville. “Open and honest discussion is important,” adds Adrian. In the event that your teen experiences excessive anxiety, he or she may be experiencing separation anxiety disorder. In this case, students may need professional help, and they can make an appointment at their school counseling center for additional support. Ultimately, the best way to deal with separation anxiety is to talk about it, Star advises the teens whom she works with. “Remember that everyone is probably feeling the same thing, so find someone to start a dialogue with so that you won’t feel so alone,” she says. Experts suggest that parents do some of the following to help teens deal with normal levels of separation anxiety: State your confidence in your teen’s ability to make it.Encourage them to engage in activities that develop confidence, life skills and maturity.Be available when your teen initiates phone calls to you.Let them know that they are always welcome at home, but help them focus their time and energy on school.Find resources to help you as a parent understand the situation. Orr recommends I’ll Miss You Too, by Margo Bane Woodacre and Steffanie Bane. If your teen is not entirely open to talking about his or her anxiety, Sue Baldwin, LMFT of Cameron Park, encourages parents to look for signs. “Some frequent signs your child might be suffering from this disorder include sudden reluctance or change of heart about going away to school. Nightmares with separation themes or unreasonable fears of danger to their parents or other loved ones are some common symptoms. In addition, physical symptoms such as headaches, stomachaches or nausea may occur.” Baldwin goes on to say that, “this is the time when seeing a counselor would help the teen identify unconscious fears, begin to identify their strengths and regain their enthusiasm for this new adventure.” Have a conversation with your teen before they go and acknowledge that anxiety is normal. Then, hug them goodbye and encourage them to move forward so that they can embark upon the great journey into adulthood. <hr> For more parent resources related to teen separation anxiety, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville, Granite Bay, Rocklin edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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