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Last Updated: 07/31/2008 05:00PM • Subscribe via RSSATOM

Dog Training

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

Dogs have long had a reputation for being man’s best friend – the work it takes to keep that friendship going is less widely discussed! Bringing an animal into your home is exciting, but it can be difficult too, for both pet and owner. Even if you have raised your dog with patience, consistency and love, he may exhibit a behavior that you don’t know how to control or temper – how do you communicate effectively with your dog in such cases? Jason Davis of The Dog Guy offers his expert advice on some of the most common behavioral problems that dog owners face.Q. What is the best way to socialize my dog with other dogs and people?Anti-social or aggressive behavior in dogs is often a source of considerable anxiety for dog owners. According to Jason, the best measures against this type of behavior are preventative, and should be taken sooner rather than later.A. “Start them when they are young! Puppies should be with their natural litter for a minimum of eight weeks, ideally 12 weeks, because there are some dog-to-dog socialization skills that can only be taught by the littermates. Once you bring your puppy home and he’s had all the appropriate vaccinations, help him experience the “world.” Get outside, daily! Take your dog on walks through your neighborhood, downtown, to the parks, lakes, trails, and anywhere that dogs are welcome to expose him to a variety of environments. If your dog is a little older and hasn’t yet had these experiences, dog day care and socialization classes are another great option.”...For more Dog (and Cat) Training tips and resources, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville, Granite Bay, Rocklin edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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John Crews

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

John Crews knows a thing or two about bicycles. After years as a professional BMX rider, he retired at the ripe old age of 24 and founded Bicycles Plus, a bicycle rental and repair shop that has grown over the last 20 years to become a staple in the Folsom community. “I’m a has-been and I love it,” John admits, referring to his 2006 induction into the American Bicycle Association Hall of Fame. These days, John is still riding, although now he rides with a larger purpose in mind. After being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2003, he founded Ride for a Reason (rfar.org), a charity to raise funds to research cures for both Parkinson’s disease and cancer. “[Being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease] made me realize the important thing in life is not money or tangibles; it brought me closer to my kids and other people. It really, truly has been a blessing.” John knows that bicycles can make a difference, not only in the fight against tragic diseases but also in our daily lives. “Riding is a great way to plug into your kids, have fun and benefit from health and fitness,” he tells us, and with the current rise in gas prices, it’s easy to see why it’s a good idea to hit the road on two wheels instead of four.<hr>For more on John Crews be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Eco-Friendly Territory

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

If eco-responsibility is necessary for the future of a healthy earth, then it is only fitting that Folsom welcome the Home of the Future – an “ultra-efficient” residential bungalow constructed by local builder Robert Walter in partnership with SMUD. Their vision: a monthly energy bill of just $24. Considering that the average energy bill (a combination of heat and gas) is somewhere in the vicinity of $140 per month for residences built to new-home standards, and factoring in what most of us are paying at the pump, the relative smallness of a $24 bill represents welcome relief to the homeowners who will pay it, and for the planet they inhabit. The master plan for the 1,940 square feet Home of the Future is nothing short of eco-genius. According to a SMUD-issued news release, the home will feature “two-inch by six-inch framing to allow more room for advanced insulation,” as well as environmentally-friendly amenities, which includes solar electricity, solar hot water, LED lighting and factory framing; the latter of which will play an instrumental role in helping the home earn LEED platinum certification — the standard by which all other green structures are judged, and very difficult to achieve. Should the Home of the Future earn LEED certification, it will be one of only two California homes to hold the honor; the other is in southern California. The aforementioned release also states that the combination of impressive technical and SMUD’s financial incentives is what makes this home a model of green building, very clearly stating that, “The ‘Home of the Future’ is meant to demonstrate to the building community and the home-buying public that attractive and ultra-energy-efficient homes can be built and marketed at reasonable prices.” The Home of the Future – a product of rigorous and thoughtful teaming – is slated for completion this month. Folsom’s older residences will surround the Home, which, somewhat ironically, is just blocks removed from Old Town.

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Starter Pets

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

Pet ownership is a rite of passage. In many ways, it’s also a test. Some people are lucky and enjoy one, maybe two pets in their life. These are lifelong friends that become honorary family members. Others, like yours truly, have owned many pets, many of them cats, and many of them unstable (read: deranged), the kind that run away in the dead of night or in the case of my first cat Smokey, are “let loose” on my uncle’s farm. (I’ll leave you to parse that uncomfortable rural euphemism.) Needless to say it took our family a while to accept that we were better off with a dog. In fact, Mindy the dog has been a beloved family member for more than 10 years… with no rural euphemisms in her future. And of course, there are those who have yet to experience the joys of pet ownership. Whether you’re a tried and tested pet owner or a newbie, one thing is for certain: there are many factors to consider when choosing a new pet. Gone are the days when you went to the pet store and pointed to the cutest animal. Well, those days aren’t necessarily “gone,” it’s just that that method is somewhat ill advised. With animal shelters and rescue homes crowded with abandoned and abused animals, many of them former pets, for the sake and safety of the animals in question, we can no longer afford to practice the “point and shoot” method of pet selection. Understanding animal breeds and their suitability to the owner’s home environment is one of the most important first steps, before even deciding on a pet.With that in mind, we’ve put together a handy guide for those of you who may be considering a new pet, or it can be an inspiration for those of you who don’t think that you need a pet. Read on, and remember: choose wisely!...<hr>For more pet picking ideas, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Youth Group

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

Among the many reasons South Placer County residents have to count their blessings is KidZKount – the DBA name for the programs and services offered by the Placer Community Action Council, Inc. (PCAC), a nonprofit organization that offers Head Start and Early Head Start programs, as well as State Preschool.According to the group’s Executive Director, Denyse Cardoza, KidZKount is the vital connector that links together PCAC’s impressive menu of services, partnerships and collaborative agreements. As such, it assists families and children of differing backgrounds from Placer and Nevada Counties. Armed with that ambitious responsibility, it is fair to say that KidZKount is really in the business of empowerment. Its vision: “To establish children and families as our Nation’s Top Priority,” is clear; its mission: “To empower children and their families to maximize their full potential through opportunities for growth and change,” is admirable; and its values: “Creating and fostering a supportive environment which promotes trust, respect, professional growth and quality leadership,” are aligned with those whom it aims to serve.KidZKount helps fulfill both its purpose and its promise by providing a variety of programs customized to address the specific needs of individual local families, including a number of center- and home-based development services. “Our goal is to help support families with social service needs, continuing their education and training in program governance,” says Cardoza, who, together with the organization’s key players, works tirelessly to do just that. As is typical with nonprofits, however, KidZKount and PCAC are not immune to fund-raising challenges. The majority of funds that the organization receives come directly from the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, D.C. In fact, 80 percent of Head Start programs are federally funded. PCAC is responsible for raising the additional 20 percent through non-federal resources, including in-kind donations from service providers, as well as parent and community members. Grants and events help supplement and fund non-federally sponsored programs. Locally, KidZKount’s Sixth Annual Golf Tournament, which will be held at Auburn Country Club on October 6, 2008, is instrumental in helping the nonprofit reach its 20 percent goal so that it can continue to offer vital services, including medical endowments to families who cannot afford health and/or developmental procedures for their children, and a myriad of worthy programs.If funding makes KidZKount possible, its comprehensive programs make it successful. Designed for the whole family, these programs involve goal setting, home visits, classroom volunteering, etc., which result in services like the KidZKount Kindergarten Readiness Summer Camp funded by First Five Placer, the Daddy Read to Me program, and others of value to the community and its families. Naturally, Cardoza gives the community, the organization’s partners, and its staff credit for helping KidZKount provide such quality services. She says, “Strong relationships make it all possible.” A variety of upcoming recruiting events will help fill KidZKount’s program enrollment for the next year. For details on how you can help, please call Recruitment Coordinator, Melinda Dudley, at 530-886-4103. If you would like to be a sponsor for the golf tournament, or if you are interested in enrolling your children in KidZKount programs, or for volunteer opportunities, please contact KidZKount at 530-885-5437.

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The Vine

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

2007 Domaine de Nizas Rosé Coteaux du LanguedocWhy not think pink? In the past, the place for pink wines was always at the lowest rung on the wine totem pole. When winos thought of pink wine, their automatic response was “White Zinfandel.” This sweet pink wine, that didn’t seem to pair well with any food, started most of us on our wine journey. Are all pinks created equal? Absolutely not!Nowadays, pink wines are coming on strong in the U.S., but in the form of dry rosé. Dry rosé wines are fruity, refreshing and extremely food friendly. For those strictly red drinkers, rosés are perfectly refreshing and still have a level of complexity that red drinkers are accustomed to, and a great alternative to a heavy Cabernet or Zinfandel. For those white drinkers, rosés can more easily transition them into exploring more intense reds.A perfectly traditional rosé comes in the form of the 2007 Domaine de Nizas Rosé Coteaux du Languedoc. This wine is a wonderful expression of what summer is meant to be. With a blend of Syrah, Grenache Noir, and Mourvedre, the color of this sunshine-in-a-bottle is a soft but vibrant pink. In the mouth, this fuller bodied rosé delights with flavors of strawberries and raspberries, finishing with a very slight toasty sweetness that lingers; think of marshmallows or a bit of caramel. Even though this wine is a traditional French rosé, the fruit-forward nature will please just about any palate. So don’t be afraid to think pink and think outside the box. Pink is in, baby!—Julie MorelandJulie is owner and Wine Psychic of WineStyles ­– Granite Bay.<hr>For more Fine Wine Selections, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville, Granite Bay, Rocklin edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Moonlight Swing Big Band

07/31/2008 ● By Super Admin

It’s 1942. A tired and lonely Allied soldier stationed in a distant land, strains to hear the music through the static on the radio. Catching the first bars of “In the Mood,” he smiles and his foot starts tapping. For a few precious minutes, home seems a bit closer. That’s what Glenn Miller did for troops during World War II. His music entertained and inspired all who heard it.People wanting to relive that moment, or experience the music for the first time are in luck. Bandleader Grant Pyle and the 21-piece Moonlight Swing Big Band have been recreating the music of the 1930s and ‘40s for more than a dozen years. This all-volunteer, not-for-profit group works hard to be faithful to the memory of Captain Glenn Miller’s 418th Army Air Forces Training Command Band. Moonlight Swing is known throughout the nation for their authentic musical arrangements, great stage presence and style.Shirley Pyle, promotions manager for the group, explains, “It is wonderful to hear the sighs and applause from the audience when they play the first few notes of ‘String of Pearls.’ People come up after the performance and tell us about where they were when they first heard a particular song.”Grant Pyle has two passions: flying and music. As the band’s leader and trombone player for nearly a decade, and as a retired Air Force Brigadier General, he is accomplished at both. He is also very passionate about the look of the band and making sure that the World War II Air Force uniforms are authentic. “I spend a lot of time hunting old Army-Navy stores searching for genuine artifacts and clothing,” he explains. The band members range from their mid-20s to a young-at-heart 83 year-old, who served in the Navy band during World War II. All members, each an accomplished musician, come from all over northern California. Their “day jobs” are as diverse as their ages: teachers, doctors, lawyers, salesmen, a city planner, a helicopter pilot and others, come together at least once a month to rehearse. “It’s a huge challenge getting everyone together,” Grant says, “but they come because of the love and dedication to the music.” Although the band showcases the sounds and sights from nearly 70 years ago, it draws a large number of young people to concerts and dances. “Swing dance is really big and kids love to dance to our music,” says Grant. For those people who saw the original band and danced to Glenn Miller, emotions always run high. “That’s what keeps us going,” Shirley says, “We thought this would be a fun gig for our retirement, but it has turned into an enjoyable full time job.”“Why do we do it?” repeats Grant, “that’s easy – the music and the people.”So, for great music and entertainment, catch the “Chattanooga Choo-Choo,” “Tuxedo Junction,” or go “Over the Rainbow” and enjoy a “Moonlight Serenade.” See you there!To check out the band, visit moonlightswing.org.

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