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Style: Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin

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Last Updated: 02/28/2009 04:00PM • Subscribe via RSSATOM

Batter Chatter

02/28/2009 ● By Super Admin

Hey, how ya doin. I’m a backstop. Yep, that big metal thing behind home plate at a ballpark near you. I know...I’m not supposed to be able to talk. Well, your kids aren’t supposed to climb on me, so we’re even. Tom was a little too busy (i.e. he couldn’t think of anything to write) so the editors asked me to step in and share a few of my thoughts on a national treasure that’s about to come back around again, youth baseball.I’ve been a backstop for a long time. The parks department put me up in ‘83. I’m 20 x 16 panelized feet of galvanized steel. I’ve seen a lot of kids playin’ ball and there’s nothing I love more. I guess you could say it’s my reason for being. Over the years I’ve noticed that a few certain elements seem to be the keys to success for everything from boy’s hardball to girl’s softball – both of which I love, by the way. Hey, backstops don’t play favorites (and neither do the umps, but no one ever believes me on that one).One: The parents gotta not only care, but care for the right reasons. If their six-year-old doesn’t poke a homer off the tee, they still oughta get a trip to the ice cream shop after the game. I’m happy to report, most parents get that. But I think the same should go for a 12-year-old. Yeah, they may look like a big-leaguer when they step up to the plate or onto the pitcher’s mound with their game face on, but in the dugout they’re still having burp contests and arguing over who would win in a fight, Batman or Spiderman. Come to think of it, so are a lot of the players in adult recreational softball leagues. Two: Hopefully your kid is out there because they love the game, because there’s no doubt they’re out there because they love YOU. They want you to be proud of ‘em – even the little tyke doing the pee-pee dance in right field. Never stop letting them know how great you think it is that they lace up their cleats – even if they’re tying them on their own now. Three: They’re learning a game – how to hit, throw, run it out to first, all that stuff. But they’re also learning life lessons like fair play, good sportsmanship and making a commitment to others. If you’re tryin’ to stack a team in the pre-season draft, or yellin’ at a 15-year-old ump for missing a call at second, or always missing practices or getting your kid there late, think about the message that sends. It sure ain’t one they’re gonna run on the scoreboard between innings at Pac Bell Park. Four: Winning is great. It’s awesome. It makes me quiver right down to my anchor blocks. But win with class – clamp down on any smack talk or in-your-face celebrations (and that includes some of you parents in the stands). And while you’re at it, teach them how to lose with grace. Sure, it’s fine to kick a little dirt, but losing a little league game shouldn’t be anything that ruins a weekend, or even the ride home. Five: Teach ‘em to support their teammates. Parents and coaches are one thing. But there’s nothing better to the ears (or heart) of a kid who just struck out for the fifth time in a row than to get some encouragement and a pat on the back from a teammate. When they finally do uncork one, it’ll be tough to tell who’s got the bigger smile.Six: Countin’ on your kid to be the next Jenny Finch or Dustin Pedroia? Great, but don’t push ‘em too hard or else you run a real risk of burning them out or wearing them out before they even reach high school. Let your kid’s drive lead you...not the other way around. That’s not to say don’t push a little, but never let that push become a shove.Seven: The most important – enjoy these moments. Once they’re gone, that’s it. You wanna come away with some great memories, right? Well, so does your child. Support, teach, and support some more. It’s pretty simple. Oh, and don’t forget the ice cream. •Catch Tom on the Pat and Tom Morning Show on New Country 105.1.

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Style: Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin
Local Area Tidbits

02/28/2009 ● By Super Admin

Spring has almost sprung...so don’t forget the start of Daylight Saving time and “spring” your clocks forward on March 8...GNC just opened a new store in El Dorado Hills at 4420 Town Center Boulevard, so make sure to visit and take care of your nutritional needs!...The Folsom CAVE After School Program is in need of several items for their middle school sites. Check out the complete list of items at <a target="_blank" href="http://www.folsom.ca.us">folsom.ca.us</a> and donate to a good cause...And speaking of the CAVE program, if you are an energetic person with strong leadership skills, and want to make a difference in a child’s life – apply to be a Summer CAVE Camp Counselor. For more information, call Ryan Erwin at 916-351-3510...On December 29, Dr. Leon Owens, founder of the Teachable Moment Foundation, which successfully helped to change laws in California associated with drunk driving, along with Captain Mike McCarthy of the Sacramento Police Department and Christopher J. Murphy, the director of the California Office of Traffic Safety, unveiled <a target="_blank" href="http://www.every37.com">Every37.com</a>, a Web site aimed at preventing drinking and driving...The El Dorado Hills Library will hold their American Girl Book Club on March 13, and every second Saturday of the month at 3:30 p.m. Participate in discussions, crafts and special projects based on the series...The El Dorado Hills CSD will offer an Intermediate Digital Photography class on March 4 (at the CSD), from 6:30-10 p.m., and again on March 23 at the Folsom Community Center.  For more information, call 916-355-7285 or register at <a target="_blank" href="http://www.webtrac.folsom.ca.us">webtrac.folsom.ca.us</a>...Travel to Tuscany, Italy for eight wonderful days (March 27-April 5) and learn the techniques of “plein aire” landscape painting from the Charles White Artist Workshop. For more information and pricing, call 916-351-1623 or e-mail <a href="mailto:info@avartgallery.com">info@avartgallery.com</a>...Also this month, every Monday night, the Ravine Bar & Restaurant will host the only Stand-up Open Mic Comedy Night in the area. See national headliners and local comedians. Sign-up at 8 p.m. and show starts 8:30 p.m. And, throughout March, the Ravine will display numerous local artists’ work with scenes featuring food, wine and local scenery on the walls of the restaurant – stop by for a bite and a viewing!...Registration is now open for the Prairie City Race Series. The first race is on April 1, so sign up early! Cost is $25 for single, and $35 for tandem for the first race. For more information, visit <a target="_blank" href="http://www.racemtb.com/registration.htm">racemtb.com/registration.htm</a>...Congratulations to Conductor and Music Director of the Sacramento Philharmonic Orchestra, Michael Morgan, who led the Cairo Opera Orchestra on January 11, which featured the Egyptian premiers of two iconic American works. The Cairo Opera’s Artistic Director invited maestro Morgan as part of an exchange started by the Sacramento Philharmonic and Sacramento community leaders in 2008...Folsom is now home to the “Green Home of the Year” and the recent recipient of the LEED’S Platinum designation from the U.S. Green Building Council, the highest honor in “green” home building. The house on Mormon Street is a new step towards “zero energy” housing, a state goal for 2020, and features recycled glass countertops and a solar unit...And check back next month for our Get Outside feature issue! •<hr>Send your news to: <a href="mailto:info@sierrastyle.com">info@sierrastyle.com</a>.

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Check-up Time

02/28/2009 ● By Super Admin

Culturally we are acutely aware of certain types of cancer, yet we remain blissfully unaware of one of the most deadly forms: colorectal cancer. Cancer of the colon, rectum or appendix, though not discussed much, is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, right behind lung cancer.Most colorectal cancer begins as polyps, or pre-cancerous growths, which are largely benign on their own, but can become cancerous if left untreated. If polyps are detected and removed early, colorectal cancer can be prevented. A Preventable DiseaseAccording to Maria Robinson of the Great Valley Region office of the American Cancer Society (ACS), colorectal cancer education is one of their primary focuses. “It is so preventable if people would just get their check-ups. Depending on the specific demographic to which an individual belongs, we recommend that regular examinations start about age 50.” Follow your doctor’s advice regarding colonic examinations.According to ACS literature, the chances of successful treatment are the greatest when colorectal cancer is detected early, using a combination of these procedures beginning at age 50:Fecal occult blood test Flexible sigmoidoscopy Colonoscopy Double contrast barium enema Experts Weigh InWe visited with three health professionals to gain some perspective on colorectal cancer and how to avoid it. Sheila Leard, a registered dietician and certified personal trainer, is aware of the concerns of patients facing colorectal cancer.Leard advises that good nutrition is important for preventing, dealing with, and surviving cancer. The cause of most cancers is still unclear, but a healthy lifestyle can improve your odds and help maintain your health during treatment. In particular, certain foods can assist in protecting you from colon cancer.Leard suggests adding these foods to your meal plan for better health:Whole-grain breads, pasta, cereal and brown riceDried beansFresh fruits and vegetables, especially applesHigh-fiber foodsVarious types of berries, including cherries, raspberries and strawberries Dr. Alan G. McNabb of Roseville Surgical Alliance sees patients with colorectal cancer after they have been diagnosed and polyps need to be removed. He removes sections of the intestine as needed, to eliminate the cancerous cells, and rebuilds sections that need it. “I am not saying that there is no reason for concern...it is really easy to spot colorectal cancer early with regular examinations,” Dr. McNabb points out optimistically. Candice Cantin of the Ever Green Herb Garden has a balanced holistic view of health in general, and this, of course, encompasses colorectal health. “We need to consider what we put into our systems,” Cantin says. “It should go without saying, but we need to remember, whatever we put in one end, has to come out the other. Think of your stomach as a big Crock Pot – you don’t want to fill it with a lot of stuff that doesn’t go together. You end up digesting some things, half digesting other things, and not digesting yet other items at all. Put in a mix of foods and fluids that work well together to keep your system in the best working order.”Cantin further points out, “In Eastern health disciplines, the rule of thumb is that you want one-third of your stomach filled with solids, one-third with fluids and leave it one-third empty, so it can work!” We should not eat to maximum capacity – this prevents your digestive tract from doing its work.Although colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death among cancers, it does not have to be. With careful preventive care and proper nutrition, this is a highly preventable disease.

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The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

02/28/2009 ● By Super Admin

In 2008, the economy played the largest role in influencing several changes in our tax system. Since there’s much more to each of the issues discussed below, we recommend that you consult your tax professional on the specifics. Here’s an overview of some of the changes affecting us in 2009.THE GOODEconomic Stimulus Checks – Get a second chance at those rebate checks, maximum of $1,200 for married couples and $300 per each qualifying child. If you were short changed last year because of various technical requirements from your 2007 tax filings, you can claim the difference based on your 2008 data when your return is filed in 2009. This is especially beneficial if you had a child or adopted a child in 2008. And if you would have received less based on 2008 data, you are not required to give back the difference on the amount you already received.  Homebuyer Credit – First time homebuyers, who are defined as anyone who has not purchased a principal residence in over three years, can receive a refundable tax credit of up to $7,500 or 10 percent of purchase price, whichever is less. The home must have been purchased after April 8, 2008 and before July 1, 2009. You can apply qualified 2009 purchases in the 2008 tax return. Unfortunately, you have to start repaying the credit to IRS over a 15-year period beginning in the second year after purchase. So technically, it’s more like an interest-free loan.   Property Tax Deduction – taxpayers who claim standard deduction can claim extra deductions for local real property taxes for 2008; maximum of $1,000 ($500 for single).   THE BADOil – Due to severe changes in gas prices, Congress changed the standard mile deduction for business purposes in the middle of the year; first half at 50.5 cents per mile and second half at 58.5 cents per mile; moving and medical miles were 19 cents for first half and 27 cents for second half of the year. Charitable miles still stands at 14 cents.Stock Market – No relief on the required minimum distribution (RMD) for 2008; only for 2009. The theory to not require RMD is that retirees should not be forced to take a distribution from their retirement accounts when the value of that account has plummeted, especially since the calculation or the RMD for 2008 is based on the account value as of December 31, 2007.  THE UGLYForeclosures and Short Sales – The real estate melt down has been the most prominent “Ugly” and largest contributor to the economic downturn. Luckily, Congress did come through here. Taxpayers can exclude from income up to $2 million of qualified principal residence indebtedness for discharges incurred on or after January 1, 2007, and before January 1, 2013. Generally, debt discharge would be considered income to taxpayers.  Auto Industry Bail Out– Even the tax incentives didn’t help the auto industry. Congress enacted a temporary increase in the allowable depreciation deduction for passenger vehicles under the luxury car rules. Basically, taxpayers could deduct over $11,000 as first-year depreciation on business use vehicles purchased and placed in service in 2008.  Again, these are just a few of the changes and only a brief discussion on each, making this a critical year to ensure you have expert advice.<hr>John Choi, CPA JD is with Professional Solutions Group, LLP in Roseville. He can be reached  at 916-791-3120 or john@prosolutonsllp.com.

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Calling All Cooks!

02/28/2009 ● By Super Admin

Cowboy Salsaby Susie Glover2 avocados, cubed1 tomato, diced1 11-ounce can shoe peg corn, drained1 15-ounce can black-eyed peas, rinsed2/3 cup chopped cilantro1 bunch green onions, chopped1/4 cup olive oil1/4 cup red wine vinegar2 cloves garlic, minced2/3 tsp. cuminSplash of lemon juice3/4 tsp. salt1/8 tsp. black pepperMix all ingredients together and start dipping.English Muffin & Ham Strataby Cathy Carmichael 6 cups diced English muffins2 cups diced ham2 cups shredded Cheddar and Jack cheese1 1/2 cup milk3-4 eggs, beaten1/4 cup Dijon mustardSalt and pepper to tasteCoat 9 x 13-inch pan with cooking spray. Line bottom of pan with half of muffin pieces. Top with one-half of ham. Sprinkle cheese on top. Repeat layers using remaining ham and cheese. In a large bowl whisk milk, eggs and mustard. Pour over the top of the strata. With a large spatula, press down on top to moisten. Wrap or freeze for later, or heat oven to 350 degrees and bake for 45-60 minutes, until cheese is melted.Iris’ Red Velvet Cakeby Iris Shipton1 box red velvet cake mix1 small box instant vanilla pudding4 eggs1 cup vegetable oil1 1/2 cup milkIcing1 block cream cheese (8 ounces), softened1 container whipped topping (8 ounces)1/2 cup sugar1 cup confectioner’s sugarPreheat oven to 325 degrees. Mix cake mix, pudding, eggs, milk and oil, and bake cake in a 9 x 13-inch pan. Cool completely. Mix cream cheese and sugar, then add confectioner’s sugar and whipped topping. Spread onto cake to frost. Serve and store in pan.The Basic Paradiseby Basic Urban Kitchen & Bar1 ounce X-Rated Brand Vodka1/2 ounce banana liqueur1/2 ounce peach schnapps2 ounces orange juice Splash of GrenadineCherry for garnish Add vodka, banana liqueur and peach schnapps to an ice-filled glass, fill remainder of glass with orange juice (approximately two ounces). Finish with a splash of Grenadine and a cherry, then enjoy!For more of our featured recipes from this month's cover story be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email info@sierrastyle.com, or call 916-988-9888.

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The Vine

02/28/2009 ● By Super Admin

L’Abbaye de Saint Ferme 2004 “Les Vinges du Soir”• Called “ The Night Vines,” this wine comes from L’Abbaye de Saint Ferme, in Bordeaux. It is aptly named because the vines are planted furthest from the Abbaye, and receive the last sun of the day. These “Night Vines” produce fruit that is naturally richer and riper. The Abbaye dates back to the 11th Century and was constructed by Benedictine monks, whom tended vines on the land paving the way for a rich history to develop.L’Abbaye de Saint Ferme 2004 is a classic Bordeaux, blended of 70 percent Merlot, 20 percent Cabernet Sauvignon, 10 percent Cabernet Franc, and is 100 percent estate grown and bottled by time-honored traditional methods in a terroir driven fashion. Aged in French Oak for six months, this vintage has a distinct nose of dark fruits with hints of violet, rich mouth–filling fruit of black cherry, and a balanced, medium body that results in a very nice finish. This wine pairs well with red meat, hearty fare, and most all dishes that call for a good Bordeaux.— Rick MindermannRick is a 30-year veteran grocer with Corti Brothers in Sacramento, personal assistant to Darrell Corti,and “The Good Taste Guy” for oodleboxtv.com.For more wine reviews from Local Connoisseurs, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email info@sierrastyle.com, or call 916-988-9888.

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Style: Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin
Local Area Tidbits

02/28/2009 ● By Super Admin

Spring has almost sprung...so don’t forget the start of Daylight Saving Time and “spring” your clocks forward on March 8.Showcase your talents at the Borders Bookstore in Roseville on March 13 for their Open Mic night at 2030 Douglas Boulevard; mic opens at 7 p.m.Join REI in Roseville for their Overnight Snowshoe Outing on March 14. Learn how to pack, navigate, and select the proper campsite. Price is $200 for members; $220 for non-members. Call or visit any area REI to sign up.Roseville Parks and Recreation is offering a trip to the Stockton Asparagus Festival on April 25. Cost is $45 or $39 with a resident discount and the deadline to register is April 1. To sign up, call 916-774-5950.For your caffeine fix, stop by Bloom Coffee and Tea, which just opened its doors in Roseville this past January, congrats to the new owners Lucas and Jacob Elia.Design Well, Live Well Interior Design and Eco-Boutique is offering an alternative to throwing away all those old wine corks. Bring in any real corks and drop them in the marked box at the cashwrap counter during store hours. For store hours, call 530-887-8719.If you’ve ever wondered how to get your work published or how to use the Internet in your music business, then the Inaugural Indie Seminars Authors’ and Musicians’ Seminar is for you. Sponsored by Prismatic Publishing and eBooks & Music, this event runs from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and includes a short story contest giving exposure and a small cash prize to the winning author. For more information contact, Sue Canfield 916-390-2262.Through March 13 Judy LewLoose will show her original paintings at the Blue Line Gallery in Roseville. Gallery is open Tuesday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.Congratulations to Rabobank for becoming the latest Roseville Arts’ President’s Circle member.Visit the “Queen of the Sierra” on April 17 with a trip to Murphys and Calaveras Big Tree State Park. Deadline to register is April 1, and is $49 or $45 with residential discount. For more information or to register, call 916-774-5350.If Yosemite is more your thing, Roseville Parks and Recreation is offering an overnight trip from May 5-6. Cost is $369 or $337 for residents; deadline to register is April 1. To sign up, call 916-774-5350.Dr. Leon Owens, founder of the Teachable Moment Foundation, with Captain Mike McCarthy, and Christopher J. Murphy, the director of the California Office of Traffic Safety, recently unveiled Every37.com, a Web site aimed at preventing drinking and driving in Sacramento.Congratulations to Hawks restaurant for receiving the Top Décor title in the new Zagat survey featuring Sacramento area restaurants. Mikuni was also a winner, being named the Most Popular restaurant among diners.The Roseville City Council approved the placement of four sculptures in Downtown Roseville, in Historic Old Town and on Vernon Street near the theaters...Look for them soon!Don’t miss Rocklin Youth Theatre’s production of Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, Jr., March 28-29. Over 60 kids will wow the audience, for tickets call 916-632-7198. Also on stage, check out William Jessup University’s first benefit dinner and concert, A Night in the Piazza, on March 26, beginning at 6:30 p.m. For ticket information, call 916-557-2256. We are still accepting Reader Recipes for consideration in upcoming issues. Please send them to info@sierrastyle.com.In the oops we’re only human department, we mistakenly listed an incorrect phone number in February for Kaiser Permanente’s Carcinoid Cancer Support Group meeting, which meets the first Saturday of every month, from 1-4 p.m. in Roseville. For more information, call 916-789-9199.Check back next month for our annual Get Outside feature issue! •Send your news and Info to: info@sierrastyle.com.

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Jim Marxen

02/28/2009 ● By Super Admin

Some artists require an elaborate studio with large windows for natural light. They require quietness and a space where they can create without being bothered or distracted. They have no sympathy for the common folk and demand to be treated as royalty. Not so with Folsom artist Jim Marxen. His studio is one-half of a parking space in his home’s three – car garage. He, his talent, easel and paints share the tiny space with a bicycle and the lawn mower. He started painting 35 years ago in junior high school with watercolors and later graduated to acrylics. But, he gave up painting for a while due to his busy family life and heavy work schedule, but after moving to Folsom from Southern California 20 years ago, he picked up the brush and canvas again. “I paint after work and on weekends,” Marxen explains. “It’s my second full-time job.”His colorful urban landscapes and figures nearly jump off of the canvas with rich vibrant hues. “My fourth grade teacher, Mrs. Korts, loved my drawings,” he says. “She inspired me to use lots of color in my work.” This use of color is reflected in all of Marxen’s work. One of his favorite subjects is the coast, specifically Monterey, Santa Cruz and Mendocino. “There is a painting everywhere,” Marxen says. “The coast has wonderful colors and angles.” His wife Leslie, a teacher at Folsom Hills Elementary, sacrifices her Sunday afternoons and most evenings so that he can paint. “I grade papers,” she says, “or watch my favorite TV shows.” Their five-year-old dog Sadie, the couple’s adorable little black Schnoodle, hangs out and keeps Marxen company while he paints.Marxen has been showing his work at various galleries around the area, and with a show this month at Sacramento’s Blue Moon Gallery – he needs lots of pieces. “I paint as much as possible,” he admits. “I push myself to keep my skills sharp.” He loves creating colorful canvases and works hard so that each one meets his high standards. He is his own toughest critic and knows what works for him and makes him happy. He also understands that painting is solitary and sometimes hard work. “Creating a painting is not a community thing,” Marxen states. “When it comes down to it, it’s you and the canvas...a battle to see who will win.”One of Marxen’s biggest fans is local attorney Jennifer Shaw. She has purchased a number of his paintings and follows his career closely. “His work is very innovative,” Shaw says. “I just love his use of color.” One of her favorites is Going Home, a painting depicting a section of the freeways in Los Angeles. It hangs prominently in her living room. Shaw is always delighted when her guests are immediately drawn to the painting. “It takes talent,” she explains, “someone with genuine inspiration, to make a freeway look interesting!”•For more information on Marxen’s work, check out marxenart.com or visit the Blue Moon Gallery at 2353 Albatross Way, Sacramento.

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